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Future of Agriculture

Welcome to the Future of Agriculture Podcast with Tim Hammerich. This show explores the people, companies, and ideas shaping the future of agribusiness. If you are curious about innovations in AgTech, rural entrepreneurship, agricultural sustainability, and food security, this is the show for you! For more details on the guests featured on this show, visit the blog at www.FutureOfAg.com. Or, to learn more about career opportunities in agriculture, visit www.AgGrad.com Make sure you’re subscribed so you can catch another fascinating ag innovator next week!
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Dec 6, 2017

This is the perfect end to our three part series on cellulosic ethanol. You have heard from Dr. Brown describing why we should care about the industry and informing us of its fundamentals. You have head from Michael McAdams describing some exciting new ideas affecting the industry and articulating how the government is involved.

Now we speak with someone in private industry. Eric Mork works for ICM that designs, builds, and manages ethanol technologies and business models. One process ICM has developed solves a very practical problem: how can we get more from the plants that we already have? 

They have accomplished this by retrofitting corn ethanol plants to also make cellulosic ethanol out of the non-corn residue that they get in. If you've ever seen a truckload of corn leave a farmer's field, you know that there is more than corn in there! ICM's process uses that residue to make cellulosic ethanol in addition to the corn-based ethanol that the plant is already processing. 

These are collaborative, interesting, and effective solutions that are going to lead us to future technologies that produce more food, fiber, and fuel using less resources. 

Visit ICM's website.

 

Thanks for listening!

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources.

  

Nov 22, 2017

This episode begins a three-part series on cellulosic ethanol and other cellulosic biofuels. 

What if we could take one of the most prolific, abundant, renewable, and sustainable items on the plant - Cellulose - and make fuel from it? 

Well, we can! Sounds fantastic, but there are, of course, challenges. It's expensive, the conversions aren't as great as we'd like them to be, there is a lot of work that needs to be done to improve the processes in order to make cellulosic biofuels a widespread reality. 

This is the first part of the three-part series where we explore these opportunities and challenges with cellulosic biofuels. Dr. Brown describes a future where farmers can produce biomass that is specifically bred to be processed into fuels that can go directly into an engine. This would, of course, take collaboration between seed companies, farmers, ethanol plants, and fuel manufacturers and retailers. 

 

Check out Dr. Brown's Bio Institute at Iowa State University

To learn more, pick up a copy of Dr. Brown's book "Why Are We Producing Biofuels?"

 

Thanks for listening!

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

 

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

 

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources.

Nov 15, 2017

How does a 30,000 acre farm operate with just 9 employees?

Lon Frahm shares with Tim how he has grown his row crop operation to over 30,000 acres, and how he uses economies of scale such as self-insuring and storing his own grain, to develop advantages over other farmers. 

Lon has a very impressive story. He took over his family's farm upon his father's death when he was just 28 years old. He has lead the operation to tremendous growth over the past 30 years and has experiences very little employee turnover. 

Lon knows the value in keeping good people on the team, learning quicker than your competition, and networking with peers in the industry. 

Whether you are a farmer, in agribusiness, or not in any related field, there are still some business gems in this episode. 

Learn more about Frahm Farmland at http://www.frahmfarmland.com

Wall Street Journal Article Featuring Lon Frahm

Visit http://www.AgGrad.com to connect to careers and employers in agriculture. 

Reach out to Tim on Twitter @timhammerich. 

Sep 13, 2017

Today’s episode will be a bit different. We normally find guests and have them share their incredible ideas and wisdom on the Future of Agriculture podcast. For this episode, we decided to change it up a bit. This time, we will have a guest host who will then interview our very own Tim Hammerich. Our guest host will be none other than Michelle Bufkin, a freelance writer for Ag Daily Media and also the very person who recently took over our Snapchat channel.

 

In this special episode, we will give you an inside look at the core principles of AgGrad, why it was made in the first place, its vision, and tidbits about my life.

 

 
“AgGrad.com exists to help people find their place in modern agriculture.”  – Tim Hammerich

 

 
This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast: 

 

  • How AgGrad got started.
  • My favorite part of seeing AgGrad grow since 2015 and my plans for the future.
  • How I choose who to feature in the podcast?
  • Why I chose Snapchat for AgGrad?
  • Why you can’t outsource all Ag careers.
  • Four pieces of advice for students who are about to graduate and go into the workforce.
  • Why I didn't like to do an internship back in college.

 

Mentioned in this episode:

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Share the Ag-Love! 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram 

 

Sep 6, 2017

Jack Gilmore is the owner and head chef of the famous Jack Allen’s Kitchen in Austin, Texas. More than good food and service, Jack Allen’s Kitchen is known for being a pioneer in what we call the “Farm to Table.” According to Jack, at least 80% of every food on his menu is locally sourced. He first got into cooking when he was 15 and taught himself how to cook when he was working part time in a restaurant. By the time he was 18, he realized school wasn’t his thing so he decided to get married and start a family.

 

Jack knew how to cook, so he figured he could make a living out of it. He worked for other people and was able to work with incredible chefs, until he grew tired of working for someone else and decided to start his own restaurant. From cooking for a decent wage to actually owning his own restaurant chain, he has come a long way.

 

On today’s episode, Jack talks about how he started his restaurant business, what made him choose to buy from local farmers as much as possible, and the logistics involved in running a locally-sourced restaurant. He also his thoughts on the future generation of farmers.

 

 
“I don't tell anybody we're a 100% local, I tell them we're as local as we can be.”  – Jack Gilmore

 

 
This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast: 

 

  • How he partnered with local farmers
  • How much of his menu is influenced by the ingredients available?
  • How he manages the many farmers he partners with as well as the logistics behind.
  • How he plans his ingredient supply forecast with the farmers.
  • How he determines which farmers to work with
  • How he shows his appreciation to the farmers.
  • Why he's not worried about the next generation of farmers as much as he is about next generation of chefs.
  • The biggest and smallest farms he buys from.
  • Is the farm to table concept still a growing concept nationwide?
  • The future of the local food movement.
  • How does he manage the food waste in his restaurant?

 

 

Check Out Jack Gilmore Across the Net: 

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Share the Ag-Love! 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram 

 

Aug 23, 2017

Aidan Connolly has been with Alltech for 27 years and is currently its Chief Innovation Officer (CIO). Alltech is a company that helps farmers feed the world, raise healthy animals, and protect the environment. He works with the company’s research department focused on developing nutrition-based technologies that will capitalize on insights gained through Alltech’s investment in nutrigenomics. Aidan’s main tasks as CIO is to spearhead Alltech’s projects in multiple facets of the agricultural industry, make sure they’re always on the cutting edge when it comes to current technology, as well as incorporating new technologies into how food is produced in the future.

 

On today’s episode, Aidan shares how he became Alltech’s CIO and how the company decides which innovation to invest in. He also explains the disruptive technologies that will greatly affect the agricultural industry in the near future.

 


“Brain power and imagination are going to be very important in terms of the roles we play.” – Aidan Connolly

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

Alltech's views on disruptive technology.
How they strategically decide when to invest in an innovation.
What is the Pearse Lyons Accelerator?
The 8 potentially disruptive technologies.
Is artificial Intelligence something humans should worry about?
How he prepares his children for the future.
Since 2009, TOP US food and beverage companies have lost an equivalent of $18 billion of market shares. How does this affect agriculture?
Can the "local food" movement scale?
How should we balance thinking about innovations and our busy lives?

 

Mentioned in this episode:

 

ONE18 Conference
Humans Need Not Apply Video

 

Check Out Aidan Connolly Across the Net:

 

Alltech
LinkedIn
Twitter

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family!

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today.

 

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website
AgGrad on Twitter
AgGrad on Facebook
AgGrad on LinkedIn
AgGrad on Instagram

Mar 22, 2017

To better understand what’s going on in the agriculture business, looking outside the boundaries is a must. Knowing how other countries do things help the agriculture industry see the bigger picture and understand how things work together in a global viewpoint.

Today’s guest, Wendell Schumm, had never thought about considering other things than milking cows. He grew up on a dairy farm and has developed a passion for it. With his dad’s support and encouragement, Wendell got a two-year business diploma at Ontario Business College. At age 21, he worked for a local coop for two years before landing another job with a feed company that is a Purina dealer. Keeping his enthusiasm for dairy by working as a dairy nutritionist, Wendell became a partner to a new nutrition company at age 26. In 2009, a privately owned feed manufacturer, Wallenstein Feed, bought this nutrition company. Wendell has been working for them ever since.

On today’s episode, Wendell shares the uniqueness of the Canadian agriculture and the impact that feed manufacturing is making globally. He talks about the reasons why contracting out a company who specializes in the mixture of the feeds is more advantageous over DIY mixed feeds. He also shares what he sees in the future of the agricultural network, the direction of the feed business, and the reasons why he started his agricultural podcast.

 

“A lot of what we want to focus on would be whatever we can do to make consumers feel good about how we’re raising their food.” – Wendell Schumm

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • The difference between Ontario and Western Canada and its proximity to the US market.
  • The benefits of having a middleman between the buyer and manufacturer.
  • The changes in the feed manufacturing and the advantages of using new technology.
  • The foundations of their system and how it ensures farmers have a predictable and sustainable income for the work they do.

Check Out Wendell Schumm Across the Net:

 

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website 

AgGrad on Twitter 

AgGrad on Facebook 

AgGrad on LinkedIn 

AgGrad on Instagram

Jan 11, 2017

On today’s episode, we're talking about insights the future of American agriculture from a policy perspective and what’s going on in Washington D.C. that is affecting it's future. The transition from the Obama administration to the Trump administration as well as the new farm bill on the horizon makes for an exciting time to look behind the curtain and figure out what is going on in our nation’s capital.

I’m very excited to have my guest, Sara Wyant, on the show. Sara founded Agri-Pulse Communications twelve years ago, which is the premier communications media company that covers stories on agricultural, energy, and environmental policy issues. She is the recipient of numerous awards for her service in the agriculture community and is also still involved in her family’s farming operation in Iowa where she grew up.

Sara will be sharing some fascinating insights with you about the future of agriculture.

 

In regards to validating news stories, do your homework. Find various reputable sources such as Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and Agri-Pulse for information you can trust. - Sara Wyant

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • She tells us how she became interested in journalism.
  • Sara shares some details about her family life.
  • We hear about how problems in agriculture encouraged her to start Agri-Pulse.
  • She tells us how the team decides on what stories to bring to their readers.
  • Sara tells us how she determines the success of her website.
  • We talk about how social media affects her business.
  • She offers her view on why it’s taking so long for the Trump team to nominate a Secretary of Agriculture.
  • We discuss using Twitter as a tool to inform her readers on important issues.
  • She tells us about what she’s most proud of accomplishing in the last twelve years.
  • I ask her how she handles building relationships in the media while not affecting quality in reporting.
  • Sara explains what ‘off the record’ means to her agency.
  • She explains how Agri-Pulse differentiates itself from other media outlets.
  • Sara tells us how she knew it was time to expand her team when she was just starting out in Agri-Pulse.
  • Sara talks about what she sees in the future for the agriculture industry.

 

Contact Sara Wyant:

 

 

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

 

 

Jan 4, 2017

Utilizing Food Waste for Urban Agriculture with Tinia Pina of Re-Nuble

The United States has a shortage of people who want to work in agriculture. We’ve gone from most of the population to only one percent of people working in this industry. There are fewer people with farms and a lack of individuals who want to make long lasting and meaningful careers in agriculture.

There is something we can do about attracting interest in farming, though, such as enticing professionals from other industries to pivot into urban agriculture, like our guest Tinia Pina did. Tinia worked in the financial sector until she learned about the problems that existed related to entrepreneurial opportunities in agriculture. Today she is the founder and CEO of Re-Nuble, a New York City company that converts food waste into organic fertilizer.

 On today’s show, Tinia shares the story of how she established Re-Nuble, and shares her insights about food waste and what it’s like to be a minority entrepreneur in the agriculture industry.

 “The lack of proper nutrition and fresh available food options impacts our future generations.” Tinia Pina

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Tinia talks about how teaching her students opened her eyes about food.
  • We talk about the supply chain that supplies organic food scraps.
  • She cites reasons why the company may not be using all the waste that is produced in the city.
  • Tinia tells us who her typical customers are.
  • She explains OMRI certification in relation to Re-Nuble.
  • Tinia tells us about her transition from the financial world to a full-time career in agriculture.
  • She shares her vision on the issue of food waste.
  • She fills us in on what the urban agriculture/ag-tech scene is like in New York.
  • Tinia tells us how she attracted her first customers.
  • She shares her thoughts on competition.
  • She discusses the disadvantages to being a minority in the agriculture sector.

 

 

Mentioned in the Show:

 

 

 

Contact Tinia Pina:

 

 

 

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

Dec 28, 2016

On today’s episode of the Future of Agriculture Podcast, my guest, Jared Flinn, is the founder and operating partner of Bulk Loads. His site provides an online platform that connects shippers with the transportation companies.

Jared graduated with a minor in agricultural economy, but wasn’t sure what he wanted to do with his credentials. He started working as a truck driver and grew to love all the aspects of the industry and eventually moved into shipping logistics in the agriculture sector. His passion for the trade inspired his vision of connecting companies and shippers, and so Bulk Loads was born.

Jared started his venture without knowing whether it would be successful, but he persevered and created a sustainable and profitable business which addressed and solved clients’ pain points. On today’s show, you’ll hear his thoughts, wisdom, and advice about taking ideas and building a business in agricultural and transportation space.

 “You have to have the commodities to trade, but behind that you have to have the efficient supply chain to get it through.” – Jared Flinn

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Jared shares his story about the route he took after he graduated from university.
  • He tells us how he found the industry’s pain points and turned that into his success.
  • Jared shares the best life and work advice he received and took to heart.
  • We talk about how the industry has changed for transportation entrepreneurs.
  • Jared explains how he strikes a balance with his business model.
  • He gives us an idea about his marketing techniques.
  • Jared shares his story about starting the company despite the resistance he met from other businesses.
  • He reveals his thoughts on Donald Miller’s message and how it relates to business.
  • We talk about the future of the transportation industry.
  • Jared talks about how he caters to his customer base.

 

Mentioned in the Show:

 

 

 

Connect With Jared Flinn:

  

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

Dec 21, 2016

This is a good time for reflection on this past year and anticipation of what is to come in 2017, and I’m energized about the potential we have in some of the strategic objectives that we’ll be rolling out here in the coming year. I’m also excited to interview our guest today who came from humble farming beginnings and is now a leader in agri-business and a force in politics.

On today’s episode of the Future of Agriculture Podcast, we have who could very well be our next United States Secretary of Agriculture, Kip Tom.  Whether Kip is nominated or not, he will play an integral role in the leadership of our industry from his home in Indiana, from Washington D.C., or across the water in South America where he has a farming operation. He is passionate about encouraging and motivating our youth to step into the agri-business sector to continue family farming operations.

Kip shares his wisdom, insights, and advice, about this business and you’ll hear how a young man who grew up on his family’s homestead became a passionate advocate of continuing the American dream of keeping family-run farming businesses alive.

 “If there’s one thing you do, work towards succession planning to prepare the next generation to grow your business and sustain it. “  Kip Tom

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Kip talks about what his unique business model.
  • He talks about how he diversifies in the farming industry.
  • He tells us about his involvement in politics.
  • Kip describes his role in the family operations.
  • We talk about ag-policy and innovation.
  • He talks about his focus and goals in the event he becomes the next Secretary of Agriculture.
  • Kip tells us his views on the challenges of our Ag producers.
  • We discuss the needs in farming and how important it is for young people to get involved.
  • Kip talks about how social media impacts our agriculture stories and relays valuable information.
  • Kip speaks about his story about agri-business in South America.
  • He shares his insights about the future of

 

Check Out Kip Tom Across the Net:

 

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

Dec 14, 2016

On today’s episode of the Future of Agriculture Podcast, I am extremely excited to chat with a guest with whom I have the utmost respect for and who I am in awe of. Dr. Temple Grandin is an author and a professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University who is passionate about agriculture and the people involved in it. Temple has revolutionized the industry with practices she devised and is a highly-regarded internationally known speaker on the subjects of autism and cattle handling.

Temple’s incredible story of overcoming personal and professional challenges to revolutionize the agriculture industry, a sector which is set in its ways, will blow your mind. She is an inspiration to everyone in general and to people who want to break into an industry where they don’t necessarily fit the mold.

Temple brings value, wisdom, and inspiration to today’s show and I’m honored and humbled to interview her. She is passionate about keeping the agriculture industry alive and shares her invaluable advice for those seeking a life in the agricultural sector.

Students get interested in things they get exposed to.” – Dr. Temple Grandin

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Temple discloses her experiences in the agriculture industry in the 20th century.

  • She expounds on the ethics of eating animals.

  • Temple speaks about encouraging all types of careers in the agriculture industry and keep it in the forefront.

  • She talks about how to best serve people in the industry who are visual learners or thinkers.

  • She gives you information and advice on autism.

  • She tells us what she likes most about teaching students.

  • Temple recounts about her life since the movie about her aired.

  • She talks about improvements in the agriculture and food processing industry.

  • Temple tells us about what’s changed in animal handling.

 

Mentioned in the Show:

 

Check Out Temple Grandin Across the Net:

 

 

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

 

Dec 7, 2016

On today’s episode of the Future of Agriculture Podcast, I am chatting with possibly one of the most active Twitter users within the agricultural space – Rob Sharkey. Rob is the host of an amazing podcast I recently discovered called The Shark Farmer Podcast.

“Sharky,” as his friends lovingly call him, runs a grain farm in Illinois in addition to an outfitters business for deer hunters. Today, I had the chance to ask him some of the most pressing questions I’ve always wanted to ask a farmer. Additionally, he shares his story of some of the most difficult challenges and obstacles he and his wife has had to face as a business owner, and he shares his unique opinion on various “ag-vocating” strategies appearing on social media over the last few years.

 

“Social media has been one of the best things for the agriculture industry.” – Rob Sharky

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Sharky explains why he decided to start his podcast and what the journey has been like for him.
  • He explains why he stopped using Twitter for about a year.
  • We discuss “hard times,” what hard times looked like for him and his wife, and how they overcame these challenges.
  • We talk about the ag-vocating strategies across social media and he shares his opinion about these messages.
  • He shares his advice to farm equipment and product sellers.
  • He shares his opinion on the different “clicks” throughout the agriculture industry.
  • Sharky shares his least favorite thing about owning a farming business, and what he thinks would change when his children take over the farm.
  • He gives us insider information on what he plans to discuss at the Ag Chat Conference later this week!

 

Check Out Rob Sharky Across the Net:

 

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots!

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

Nov 30, 2016

This episode is going is going live on the last day of November 2016. Many of us in the U.S. still have turkey in our bellies and are wrapping up a week of delicious food. 

This is the perfect setting to dive into the fascinating world of the commercial turkey industry. Over 46 million turkeys are grown every year just in the state of Minnesota. 

The birds are grown indoors with technology to monitor every aspect of the feed, water, and environment. On this episode we speak with Steve Olson, who is the Executive Director of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association. 

We discuss the impacts of the use of antibiotics and of diseases such as avian influenza. Steve also shares about the family farmers who grow and care for the birds and the business model that has sustained some of the farmers for generations.

Also we discuss changing consumer demands and technologies that have lead to growers being able to produce twice as much meat while using half the feed as operations that existed decades ago.

To learn more visit the Minnesota Turkey Growers:

 

Website:http://minnesotaturkey.com/

YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfzwGGj8Gv0-IGA8A7XAaGA

 

Steve also references this fascinating video by Temple Grandin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=852zxDEAR-Q&t=530s

 

Thanks for listening!

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. We also encourage you to tell any of your friends that are interested in farming, livestock, agribusiness, or AgTech to check out our show!

Nov 23, 2016

Kevin Heikes is the Founder of In10t.io, an advisory firm dedicated to helping clients solve problems in Agriculture related to technology strategy, product commercialization and digital system design.

Kevin has worked with several start-ups, including FarmLink, where he served as Vice President of Product and Farms Technology where, post acquisition, by DuPont Pioneer he led the integration and product migration to DTN. 

This episode is filled with new ideas, tactics, and anecdotes that will both entertain and inspire anyone interested in the future of agriculture.

Kevin mentions a couple of tools including Full Contact and Product Hunt.

Check out Kevin’s personal website: http://www.kevinheikes.com/ or his company: http://www.in10t.io/.

 

Thanks for listening!

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. We also encourage you to tell any of your friends that are interested in farming, livestock, agribusiness, or AgTech to check out our show!

Nov 16, 2016

AgriCorps sends American college graduates and professionals into developing nations to teach agriculture and to build local agricultural communities. The volunteers, known as AgriCorps Fellows, work for one year in countries such as Ghana and Liberia.

Trent shares his perspective on the future of agriculture in Africa, challenges and rewards of agricultural development, and the differences between U.S. and African food production. I agree with his perspective that Africa will grow into a major player in global agribusiness. So do many major corporations, who are rapidly expanding into the region.  

Enjoy Trent’s firsthand experiences and I look forward to hearing your feedback about your perspective on international development and the future of agriculture in Africa. 

Learn more about AgriCorps: https://agricorps.org/join/im-interested-in-more/

Like AgriCorps on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/agricorps/

 

I encourage you to consider becoming an AgriCorps Fellow or contributing to their crowdfunding campaign!

 

Thanks for listening!

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. We also encourage you to tell any of your friends that are interested in farming, livestock, agribusiness, or AgTech to check out our show!

Nov 9, 2016

Dr. Nate Storey holds a PhD in Agronomy and Crop Science from the University of Wyoming. He started his company, Bright Agrotech while completing his graduate studies.

Six years later, Bright Agrotech are leaders in the high density indoor and greenhouse farming industry. They partner with farmers of all sizes to build a fresher, more distributed food system.

Many of you, especially the more entrepreneurial-minded, will really enjoy this episode. Vertical farming holds promises of entry-level farming with low startup costs, good margins, and excellent production per square foot. We often talk about the future of agriculture battling the challenge of producing more food with less land, water, fertilizer, chemicals, and environmental impact. Many of those elements are addressed with vertical farming and mentioned in this episode.

If you’ve often dreamed of being in production agriculture but don’t have land in your family, give this one a listen!

Check out Bright Agrotech’s Website and YouTube Channel.

 

Thanks for listening! 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. We also encourage you to tell any of your friends that are interested in farming, livestock, agribusiness, or AgTech to check out our show!

 

Nov 2, 2016

According to AgFunder, over $4 billion poured into AgTech investments in 2015. Many times when people think of the recent AgTech craze, their mind immediately goes to drones.

I have been curious about drones for quite some time, both from a "coolness factor" perspective and from the perspective of "what's really that great about them in agriculture?".

I had been looking to bring on a drone expert to the podcast for quite some time, but didn't want someone who would be too technical or would look at it from an impractical angle. One day on Linkedin I came across the article "Applications of UAVs in Agriculture" by Michael Dunn, CCA. I knew I had found my next podcast guest.

Michael is able to talk about drones from the perspective of the farmer and from someone who is trying to help the farmer utilize technology to improve their operation. He is both technically knowledgeable as well as practically sensible about the uses of drones in agriculture, their limitations, and their potential.

I hope you enjoy this interview with Michael Dunn of Anez Consulting.

 

Connect with Michael on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunn-cca-75a64028

Check out Anez Consulting: http://anezconsulting.com/

 

Thanks for listening!

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using. 

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. We also encourage you to tell any of your friends that are interested in farming, livestock, agribusiness, or AgTech to check out our show!

Oct 26, 2016

Happy Halloween! 

I hope for many of you this means the end to a successful growing season and a bountiful harvest. To celebrate this season, we are happy to bring on a farmer who has recently started a venture in the agritourism space.

Matt Krueger of K&D Krueger Farms is a 4th generation farmer in the Red River Valley of Minnesota. Two years ago, Matt and his family decided to launch a corn maze for the people of his community.

The response has been outstanding, and Matt expects upwards of 5,000 people to attend the Valley Corn Maize this year. Matt shares his experiences in this industry, the help he has received, and the ability for families to make lifelong memories through this business.

 

You can learn more about the Valley Corn Maize here: http://www.valleycornmaize.com/

If you’re interested in contacting Matt or learning more about his overall farming operation, visit his website: http://www.kdkruegerfarms.com

Matt also mentions the assistance he has received from the The Maize Company:http://www.themaize.com

 

Thanks for listening!

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. We also encourage you to tell any of your friends that are interested in farming, livestock, agribusiness, or AgTech to check out our show!

Oct 19, 2016

The amount of biased propaganda on the internet is incredible. Especially in this politically divisive season, we are surrounded by information that cannot fully be trusted.

Where can one go for well-researched, scientific facts? For politics: your options are slim. But for food and agriculture, we have the Center for Food Integrity. On this episode, Tim discusses objective research in agriculture, and how we can articulate truthful messages in an unbiased way.

JJ Jones grew up in Northwest Kansas and has worked in various aspects of the agriculture industry throughout his career. He now spends the majority of his time building trust in the food supply through The Center for Food Integrity. JJ is an objective, articulate, thoughtful, and well-researched advocate for best practices in food production. Enjoy this interview with JJ.

 

Center For Food Integrity Website

 

 

Thanks for listening!

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources.

Oct 12, 2016

Little Herds is a non-profit organization that promotes insects as food and feed. In this episode, Robert Nathan Allen (“RNA”) describes why insects should be a larger part of our diet and feed. Also, he describes the business models of some current insect farming operations.  

Even if you’re not going to rush out and buy some cricket protein bars, the case for insects, especially for feed, is compelling. Enjoy this episode with an open mind and let me know what you think about the pros and cons of large scale insect farming.

 

Little Herds Website

Robert Nathan Allen on Twitter

 

Thanks for listening!

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources.

Oct 5, 2016

Brian Hogue and his team at Arable Media have a deep knowledge of agriculture, and an eye for what makes stories interesting to tell on video.

Arable creates video content specializing in agricultural, outdoor, and rural lifestyles. Through use of specialized equipment such as 360 degree cameras and drones, they can tell your story accurately and beautifully. 

Brian is an entrepreneur, world traveler, and all around great guy. Enjoy this interview!

 

Arable Media Website

Brian Hogue on Twitter

 

Thanks for listening!

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below. 

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources.

Sep 28, 2016

When Johnny Georges walked onto the set of Shark Tank it was clear that he was not your average entrepreneur. Wearing a tee shirt and a ball cap, Johnny pitched his business that sells the Tree T-Pee. His product serves as both a water containment and frost protection system for tree crop farmers in Florida.

 

Johnny left with a deal to partner with John Paul Dejoria of Paul Mitchell and Patron fame. Also, he left with a recorded pitch that would go viral and ultimately be viewed over a billion times.

 

What struck me about interviewing Johnny was his authenticity. This was also one of his strengths on the program. Johnny is the real deal. He has a heart of gold and truly cares about the future of agriculture.

 

Since Shark Tank his business has exploded. He now has customers around the world and has ramped up his manufacturing to meet demand. He considers “JP” (DeJoria) a God-send, and speaks to him regularly.

 

Check out Johnny’s famous Shark Tank pitch.

 

Visit the Tree T-Pee website and Facebook Page.

 

Thanks for listening!

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below.

 

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using.

 

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources.

Sep 21, 2016

Dr. Pamela Marrone, CEO and founder of Marrone Bio Innovations (MBI), started the company in 2006 to discover and develop effective and environmentally responsible, biologically-based products for pest management and plant health. In August 2013, she led the company IPO on the NASDAQ stock exchange.  

 

Marrone Bio Innovations are experts at discovering, developing, and commercializing naturally derived technologies. They have created an industry-leading platform of pest management and plant health products that are used in agricultural, turf and ornamental, and water treatment applications. Their solutions help customers around the globe control pests, improve plant health, and increase crop yields while reducing the environmental pesticide load, decreasing chemical residues on food, and fighting the development of pest resistance. 

 

Reach out to Dr. Marrone on Twitter 

Visit the MBI website 

 

Thanks for listening! 

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below. 

 

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using. 

 

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. 

Sep 14, 2016

“City folks just don’t get it” 

That’s the slogan of FarmersOnly.com, an online dating service for those that value the rural lifestyle. In this episode, Jerry Miller, the founder of FarmersOnly.com discusses the challenges of getting the website launched and why its has been so popular (now over 6 million users!).  

This episode is interested from both an agriculture entrepreneurship perspective, but also it’s just interesting to learn about this unique business serving our industry.  

Check out www.FarmersOnly.com for more information.  

 

Thanks for listening! 

 

We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to the Future of Agriculture Podcast. The response has been outstanding. Please feel free to leave a note in the comment section below. 

The best way to spread the word about our Podcast is to share your favorite episode using the social media share buttons in the podcast player you are using. 

You can also leave a review on iTunes. This helps us spread the word about the people, perspectives, and innovations that will provide our future food, clothing, fuel, shelter, and natural resources. 

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