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Future of Agriculture

Welcome to the Future of Agriculture Podcast with Tim Hammerich. This show explores the people, companies, and ideas shaping the future of agribusiness. If you are curious about innovations in AgTech, rural entrepreneurship, agricultural sustainability, and food security, this is the show for you! For more details on the guests featured on this show, visit the blog at www.FutureOfAg.com. Or, to learn more about career opportunities in agriculture, visit www.AgGrad.com Make sure you’re subscribed so you can catch another fascinating ag innovator next week!
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Now displaying: 2020
Apr 15, 2020

Matthew Pryor joins us today as not only a partner in AgThentic, an Australian based food, and ag sustainability and innovation consulting firm, but also as a co-founder of Tenacious Ventures, a food and ag venture capital firm that just closed their first fund of nearly $30 million. As though that wasn’t enough, Matthew has already successfully exited two different startups. To say he has his finger on the pulse of ag innovation, sustainability and company start-ups is putting it mildly.  In this episode, we discuss Matthew’s rise to success from an entrepreneurial point of view beginning with his first company, Observant. Observant is a company that was born from an issue of water management for cattle in remote areas of Australia. Matthew was solving this water management problem with “bespoke micro-electronics” that they were building themselves.

 

“We were pretty mindful about looking at other industries. And the filter that we wanted everything to pass was why should this be different in ag?” - Matthew Pryor

 

Observant focused on finding different ag applications for technology originating outside of ag They also strived to create a simple “solid, reliable, agricultural product” to ease any consumer-adoption challenges. Matthew shares that especially in the agricultural hardware space the “product better work and if it doesn’t, your reputation will suffer.”

 

“Customer success is about fundamentally understanding human psychology and what makes people feel like you know what they need and that you’re going to get it to them as soon as possible.” - Matthew Pryor

 

Observant supplied all of “the information and diagrams” and provided a great deal of support to their customers if needed. He compares their strategy to an Apple store. If an Apple product needs repairs you will gladly return to the Apple store to visit with their technicians because of their perceived customer service. By doing this, they provided a “sense of being supported (and) a sense of being understood” which the customers appreciated. Following the success of Observant, Matthew spent his time growing the agtech space in Australia and eventually moved on to AgThentic. AgThentic assists startups by giving them access to experience, advising them on how to raise money, and “helping them work out how to tell a story better.” This exposure to startups led him to create Tenacious Ventures to help match startups with capital. With years of experience under his belt, he is not only supporting startups but also organizing funds for them. So what basic advice does he give would-be entrepreneurs?

 

“There is nothing harder than being an entrepreneur. You’re strapping in for a long period of hard slog and you better know why you’re doing it.” - Matthew Pryor

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Meet Matthew Pryor
  • Learn about Matthew’s rise to success as an entrepreneur in Australia’s Agricultural Technology Industry
  • Explore what set his original company apart in customer service
  • Discover how he helps guide startups and what advice he shares with them

Connect with Matthew Pryor

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

 

 

Apr 8, 2020

We made it to episode 200! Drones have become a sort of symbol for modern ag technology whether over-hyped or legitimate. Michael Ott, CEO of Rantizo, proves that there is little room to be a drone skeptic anymore. Rantizo uses drones with a ten foot boom sprayer to spray, seed and sometimes even pollinate crops. Their main customers are retailers interested in expanding their territory by virtue of ease of application and mobility of equipment.

 

“We can get into fields where nobody else can….We’re doing a demo tomorrow, it’s going to be super sloppy and muddy. That’s totally fine. We can get out and apply in those situations.” - Michael Ott

 

The inputs carried by the drone are tailored to keep its weight below 55 pounds. At this weight, Michael says he “can train pretty much anyone to be an operator” through a 2-3 day course. The drone flies itself requiring the operator to only hold the controller rather than actively maneuver the drone. The light weight does result in multiple trips to refill tanks to be able to cover a field. But in this instance that doesn’t serve as a disadvantage. Using this technology enables the farmer to precisely deliver the inputs to specific areas in the field that require them.

 

“So rather than spray the whole field, we sprayed just a portion of it. So there’s a significant advantage for the farmer, especially because we can dramatically reduce your input costs.” - Michael Ott

 

Another added benefit is the mechanical air movement of the crops caused by the drone. This slight movement allows the spray to better cover beyond the top of the plants. A coordinated effort with this equipment can keep pace with what most tractors are doing. Does it sound too good to be true yet? Regulatory restrictions represent the biggest obstacle to drone spraying operations. While Rantizo is licensed by the FAA there are individual state requirements that can involve anything as simple as filling out a form to 500 hours of experience. With Rantizo’s operator course they help you find and meet all of the requirements for each state. There is very little these drones can’t do and at a fraction of the cost. This is the future of agriculture.

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Meet Michael Ott, CEO of Rantizo
  • Learn about the groundbreaking technique Rantizo is able to achieve with automated drone farming
  • Explore the many benefits in labor costs, chemical costs, equipment costs and long-term weed resistance that can be achieved
  • Discover the barriers to entry to becoming an operator of this technology and how Rantizo can help you navigate them
  • Hear why operators were required to wear a seatbelt when they first became licensed

Connect with Rantizo

  • Share this episode and tag @rantizosprays to possibly be selected for a demonstration of the technology at your location!
  • Visit their website at rantizo.com

Farmer Spotlight: Clayton Wolfe

  • Northerly grows and delivers sustainably grown oats to not only grocery outlets but also directly to its consumers
  • Learn about the Climb to Give Program and Northerly’s commitment to supporting St. Mary’s Food Bank and get involved!

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

 

 

 

 

Apr 1, 2020

Is it possible to become a rancher when you aren’t born into a land inheritance? Aimee Danch and Jeremiah Stent from Square Mile Ranch join us today to talk about their recent purchase of a 370-acre ranch in Wallowa, Oregon.

 

Like people buy a fixer-upper home for their first one. We’re buying a fixer-upper ranch for our first one and we feel really excited about (it). -Jeremiah Stent

 

Both Jeremiah and Aimee have experience managing ranches across and even outside the country. Originally their goal was to manage livestock and land rather than own their own. They planned on being able to “sell semi truckloads of finished animals and get a paycheck.” But the allure of ownership, autonomy, personally contributing to a local community and being able to manage at their own discretion led them to start looking at land for sale. By pursuing services from the Farm Service Agency Joint Financing Program they were able to gain access to operating loans. Pairing that with an individual investor allowed them to take their first steps into ranch ownership.

 

That’s what people think about farmers and ranchers buying land. They (think) they probably pay for it with what they’re going to grow there. But that's not very common anymore” - Aimee Danch

 

Despite working very long hours and needing to find supplemental income off the farm Aimee explains that their “quality of life is so high.” They enjoy the food they produce, the “amazing relations” with their neighbors, the “hands-on time with their daughter” and the control over their own schedule.

 

There is a huge amount of flexibility in this lifestyle and just the sheer beauty and satisfaction of what we’re doing seems to make up for the other parts.” - Aimee Danch

 

At this time they are raising grass-fed beef, pastured hogs, pastured chickens and grass-fed lambs. Their farming model relies on a small quantity of high-quality livestock focused on a customer base that is “looking to make a direct connection to where they’re sourcing their food and to know what their food is eating.” In this model, they are able to sit down and tell their customers their story and to have them ask questions. This has created a very loyal following in their customer base that by word of mouth continues to expand. I took a visit to one of their pork drop off sites in Boise and was struck by the ability of their product to be used as a powerful tool for building a real community.

 

Their main takeaway for would-be ranchers is to “find somebody to work for that's going to help pay for your education.” Work in the field and gain experience before jumping all in to avoid “a really steep learning curve getting into this.” They also suggest “seeking out people that are going to give you a really hard honest truth about what it looks like.” “Unless you can afford your mistakes” this experience and knowledge will save you from being overwhelmed.

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

  • Meet Aimee and Jeremiah of Square Mile Ranch
  • Learn the journey they took towards gaining ranch ownership
  • Explore how their current ranch model was not what they anticipated it to be
  • Find out what makes their product unique and the retention rate of customers consistent
  • Learn the advantages to ranch ownerships and some of the hardships
  • Hear their advice to would-be ranchers looking to pursue ranch ownership someday

Connect with Aimee and Jeremiah

Share the Ag-Love!

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting:

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter

AgGrad on Facebook

AgGrad on LinkedIn

AgGrad on Instagram

 

 

 

Mar 25, 2020

 

 

Chris Peacock is the CEO and Founder of AQUAOSO, a company that aims to build a water-resilient future through software and technologies that identify, analyze, and monitor water risk in the economy. Chris is a three-time water tech entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience in the water industry. He works with agricultural lenders and helps reduce their financial risk by providing analytics and insights on water risk management.

 

Chris joins me today to share AQUAOSO’s main goal and how it can help interpret water data that can benefit both banks and farmers. He discusses the importance of knowing where farm water is sourced and how much water they use. He explains why there is an imperative need to address water needs from both an economic and humanitarian perspective. Chris also describes what happens if AQUAOSO becomes a successful company in the future.

 

 

 

“The reality is, extreme water events, degrading water quality, these are all happening. We need to find ways to manage around them. We can't really ignore them anymore.” - Chris Peacock

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • My thoughts on the current effects of the coronavirus.
  • What AQUAOSO is and what it aims to do to help farmers.
  • The importance of knowing water data and how it impacts bank loans.
  • How AQUAOSO’s tech can help provide accurate water data.
  • The different water problems and issues each state faces.
  • How Chris defines water scarcity and how it impacts economics.
  • The economics of water and how you price it.
  • AQUAOSO’s plans for the business and what to expect in the future.
  • The water risks we're facing now and what we should do.

 

 

Connect with Christopher Peacock

 

 

 

 

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram 

 

 

 

Mar 18, 2020

 

 

Mark Kahn is the Managing Partner of Omnivore, an India-based venture capital firm specifically focusing on funding entrepreneurs who are working to advance agriculture and food systems. Before this role, Mark served as the Executive Vice President of Strategy and Business Development at Godrej Agrovet and Strategy Manager of Syngenta. Mark earned his MBA from Harvard Business School and has extensive experience in rural marketing, corporate strategy, product development, research and development, mergers and acquisitions, and new business incubation.

 

Mark joins me today to discuss his business, Omnivore, and share his insights on the agritech landscape in India. He shares differences between the makeup of the agricultural sectors in India versus the United States, including how the family dynamic plays a role in certain Indian aspects of agriculture such as dairy farming. Mark also explains impact investing, and what Omnivore looks for when it comes to choosing which start-ups to invest in.

 

 

 

“Venture capital is like jet fuel. If you put jet fuel in a jet, the jet flies. If you put jet fuel in a Ford, the Ford explodes.” - Mark Kahn

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • What led Mark to build his venture capital firm Omnivore and some of the companies the firm has invested in.
  • How to determine whether or not your company is suited for venture capital and the role of scalability in making this determination.
  • Trends Mark has noticed with entrepreneurship and the talent dynamic in India’s start-up sector.
  • The farming dynamic in India, including how many farmers there are in the country and the average farm size.
  • How the Indian dairy industry works, the socio-cultural aspects of this, and the industries India ranks highly in.
  • What leads many smallholder farmers to want to adopt new technologies and how accessibility plays a role.
  • What impact funding and impact investing is, how it is a spectrum, and how it differs from ESG investing.
  • Changes Mark has seen in agriculture, what he sees for the future of agriculture, and why Mark prefers “agritech” over “agtech.”
  • Mark’s thoughts on exits and three ways exits could happen.

 

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

 

Connect with Mark Kahn

 

 

 

 

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram 

 

 

 

Mar 11, 2020

 

 

Sam Watson Jones is a fourth-generation farmer and the co-founder of Small Robot Company, an agri-tech startup firm that specializes in advancing agriculture through artificial intelligence and robotics. Specifically, Small Robot Company uses precision agriculture to promote efficiency over speed. Sam is also a director of his family’s farming, house building, and manufacturing business, Howle Manor Group.


Sam joins me today to discuss a different way of looking at precision agriculture and how his brand, Small Robot Company, is making waves in the agricultural industry. He shares some insights on agricultural technology entrepreneurship as well as current trends in agriculture. Sam also highlights how his brand’s technology enables per plant precision agriculture as well as his vision for the future of farming.

 

 

 

“We are not looking to replace the farmer. We are looking for this technology to empower the farmer.” - Sam Watson Jones

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • Sam’s journey back to his family’s farm and what he realized about the farm’s business model.
  • The trend of precision farming and how big of an industry it currently is.
  • The potential relationship between small smart machines and per plant precision farming.
  • Concerns Sam has with bigger machines and the impact they could have on soil health.
  • Sam’s perspective on what kills so many entrepreneurial ideas.
  • The power of shifting your mindset from thinking “how” to thinking “who.”
  • The three robots that Small Robot Company is working to create and their functions.
  • Sam’s “farming as a service” model, how it differs from other models, and why his company chose that route.
  • The reason monocultures exist, whether or not it is natural, and the implications.
  • How innovation will influence big players in agriculture.
  • The potential of what could happen to the cost of production over the next five years.
  • How Sam’s farmer background aided his perspectives as an entrepreneur.
  • Sam’s hopes for the future of agriculture, our farmlands, and the 4th Agricultural Revolution.
  • The personality behind Small Robot Company and why this branding matters.

 

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

 

Connect with Sam Watson Jones

 

 

 

 

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

 

 

Mar 4, 2020

 

 

Michael Stenta is the software developer and owner of farmOS, a web-based app used for planning, record keeping, and general farm management. What sets farmOS apart from other apps is its open-source nature. This means the app can be tweaked or fixed by virtually any contributor. To take advantage of its open-source nature, Michael also created Farmier, a platform that makes it easy for farmers to update or host their farmOS systems.

 

Michael joins me today to discuss what farmOS is, its purpose, and why he decided to develop it. He shares where his passion for programming came from and what inspired him to apply his skills to the ag industry. He explains the unique aspects of creating an app that is open-source by nature and some of the benefits and risks involved with open-source platforms. Michael also describes what the farmOS community is like and the onboarding process involved with using the app.

 

 

 

"We've been sharing ideas forever. It's really the foundation of civilization." - Michael Stenta

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • When his passion for development met agriculture.
  • Comparing software development to solving puzzles.
  • The humble beginnings of farmOS and what it aims to do.
  • What it's like working with an open-source community.
  • The advantages of working with open-source software.
  • The different costs involved in software development.
  • What the farmOS community is like and its members.
  • How farmers will be onboarded using farmOS.

 

 

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

 

 

Connect with Michael Stenta

 

 

 

 

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram 

 

 

 

Feb 26, 2020

 

 

In10t CEO Randy Barker joins me to share some high-level thoughts on customer adoption. He told me it all starts with the farmer, and the recognition that all farmers are different.
 

 

In10t collaborator Chad Rubbelke is a farmer in Central North Dakota who is a great example of someone who is the right type of collaborative, intelligent, and curious farmer collaborator any company would want to work with. Along with Chad, we talk with John Grandin, who is the National Agronomy Coordinator for Compass Minerals, which is an industry-leading plant nutrient company.
 

 

 

 

"Adoption is important to everyone. It's the transactional endgame." - Randy Barker

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • What IN10T looks for in farmer collaborators.
  • The ideas and questions discussed when engaging with farmers.
  • Problems farmers bring up that the company often addresses.
  • The difference between new and old ways of connecting with farmers.
  • How Randy got started with doing technology trials with tech companies.
  • The negative outcomes that can happen if they get the trials wrong.
  • Why Chad chose to work with John and his company.
  • The results of the project and what they learned from the trials.
  • The benefits of using his farm as a testbed for new technologies.
  • What Compass will do with the data they gathered from Chad's farm.
  • The skills Chad has learned since working with Compass.
  • The different challenges and crops Compass encounters.

 

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

 

Connect with Randy Barker:

 

 

 

 

Connect with John Craft and Chad Rubbelke:

 

 

 

 

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram 

 

 

 

Feb 19, 2020

 

 

Jim Pantaleo is a renowned expert and consultant for Indoor Vertical Farming and offers ag companies sound and technical advice on best practices. Some of his services include performing market research and business development work. Other than companies, Jim also works with different universities such as the University of Arizona, UC Davis, and the University of Santa Barbara. He also enjoys writing about indoor vertical farming and regularly speaks at ag-related conventions.

 

Jim joins me today to describe how indoor vertical farming will change the way we look at sustainable food sources. He shares the current technology available for indoor vertical farming and what we can expect in the next few years. He discusses the myths about soil nutrition and crops regarding indoor environments. Jim also explains why the ag industry is experiencing its own version of the Dot Com era.

 

 

 

"There's no degradation of nutrients when growing indoors because you’re controlling that environment." - Jim Pantaleo

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • The different kinds of skills modern agriculture needs.
  • Why fruiting plants are the goal of indoor agriculture.
  • The current challenges of indoor vertical farming.
  • The debate around nutrients, soil, and natural sunlight.
  • How they control the crops' nutrient inputs.
  • What The AgTech scene in Los Angeles is like.
  • The major costs of having an indoor farm.
  • Startups that have made great strides in indoor farming.
  • Comparing the Dot Com era and the rise of indoor farming.

 

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

 

Connect with Jim Pantaleo:

 

 

 

 

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram 

 

 

 

Feb 12, 2020

 

 

Michael Bosworth is the President & CEO of Next Generation Foods, a food business that markets and distributes locally produced foods in the Northern California area. Brent Lafollette, Martin Miller, and Robert James Woodry are 5th generation farmers and the founders of Premium Growers, a company that produces and sells a variety of flavored, premium roasted Oregon Hazelnuts. They are some of the many farmers who transitioned from being producers to direct-to-consumer retailers.

 

Michael joins me today to share his company’s humble beginnings. He explains how he puts a price tag on his products and how much of his farm is dedicated to retail. He also describes the benefits of going to food shows. Brent, Martin, and Robert discuss why they decided to start a hazelnut company. They share the effort it took to get their company up and running. They also describe the marketing process involved with their hazelnuts.

 

 

 

“It's incredible what you can learn about how people are using your products.” - Michael Bosworth

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • The origins of Michael Bosworth’s company and how they transitioned from a farm to a food business.
  • The first client who asked them to supply organic ingredients.
  • Adding their margin and how the ingredient price and competition factor in.
  • The percentage of farm production that goes to the food business aspect.
  • Attending food shows and scouting for new food products to offer clients.
  • The type of clients they like to work with.
  • Brent's farming background and how he, Bob, and Marty founded Premium Growers
  • Their hazelnut product and the processing involved before clients receive them.
  • How they set up their business to be a direct-to-consumer type of company.
  • How long it took for their business to become stable.
  • The customer feedback they've received since they started.

 

 

 

 

 

Connect with Michael Bosworth:

 

 

 

Connect with Brent, Martin, and Robert:

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Join the Conversation!

To get your most pressing ag questions answered and share your perspective on various topics we’ve discussed on the Future of Agriculture podcast, head over to SpeakPipe.com/FutureofAg and leave a recorded message!

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! And be sure to join the new Future of Agriculture Membership for even more valuable information on the future of ag.

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

 

Feb 5, 2020

 

 

Micki Seibel is an investor, advisor, and tech builder who was part of the team behind internet products such as Netscape and eBay. She is currently an Operating Partner for Radicle Growth, an acceleration fund that partners with entrepreneurs who have ideas that can innovate the future of food. She has over 20 years of experience in building companies and has made much of it at Silicon Valley. Micki also serves on the advisory board of multiple food system startup companies such as Swarm Technologies.

 

Micki joins me today to share how Radicle Growth is helping startups in the AgTech industry. She discusses the goals of Radicle Growth, their criteria when selecting companies to fund, and the ideas that they want to promote. She describes her career in Silicon Valley and how it led her to be part of the food industry. Micki also explains the effects of climate change on the ag economy and ag innovations.

 

 

 

“Selling to a corn grower in Iowa is not at all the same as selling to a strawberry farmer in California or Chile.” - Micki Seibel

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • Solving the problem of rural connectivity in AgTech.
  • Where her interest in food and agriculture stems from.
  • The different companies she has worked for previously.
  • The technical experience she gathered before becoming part of the AgTech industry.
  • How she developed an interest in the connectivity problem in agriculture.
  • Her thoughts on AgTech and IoT companies and what they should focus on.
  • The people behind Radical Growth and the aim of the company.
  • What it takes to sell the same product to a variety of ag markets.
  • The difference between AgTech and a typical tech investing business.
  • Will the ag industry favor indoor farms or regenerative agriculture?
  • The effects of climate change on agriculture innovations.

 

 

Resource:

 

 

 

 

Connect with Micki Seibel

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Join the Conversation!

To get your most pressing ag questions answered and share your perspective on various topics we’ve discussed on the Future of Agriculture podcast, head over to SpeakPipe.com/FutureofAg and leave a recorded message!

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

 

Jan 29, 2020

 

 

Mike Barrow is the Project Lead at OpenVino, a company that aims to create the first-ever open-source, transparent winery, and wine-based cryptocurrency under the Costaflores label. Costaflores is a boutique organic winery based in Argentina. As suggested, OpenVino will rely on blockchain technology to engage in a new and innovative way of selling wine products. With over 30 years of experience in IT, data science, and cloud services, Mike aims to disrupt the wine world with a business that converts consumers into shareholders.

 

Mike joins me today to share how OpenVino will innovate the way we consume wine through blockchain tech. He shares his passion for wine, what inspired him to start OpenVino, and why he chose to make the company open-source. He explains their data collecting strategies and how consumers can benefit from buying their cryptocurrency. Mike also describes how wine is priced and why quality is second to story.

 

 

 

“The quality of the wine is not dictated by the quality parameter as much as the story behind it.” - Mike Barrow

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • How an open-source winery works and how you can profit from it.
  • Why it's difficult to sell wine regardless of price.
  • The questions that led him to start an open-source winery.
  • The data he needs to collect and how he makes sure his customers understand it.
  • How blockchain fits into their business strategy.
  • A quick recap of what blockchain is and how it works.
  • Determining the best price for their wine products.
  • Why they chose to tokenize their wine production.

 

 

Resource:

 

 

 

 

Connect with Mike Barrow

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Join the Conversation!

To get your most pressing ag questions answered and share your perspective on various topics we’ve discussed on the Future of Agriculture podcast, head over to SpeakPipe.com/FutureofAg and leave a recorded message!

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

 

Jan 22, 2020

 

 

Reinier van der Lee is the CEO & Founder of Vinduino, an AgTech company that supports farmers and other producers in the ag industry with products that improve profits and fruit quality as well as increase yield. One of the company’s latest products is the Vinduino R4 Sensor station, an open-source sensor that gives farmers data on water usage and efficiency. Reinier also owns a 4-acre vineyard and credits his need for better irrigation management as the reason why he founded Vinduino.

 

Reinier joins me today to share how Vinduino is helping farmers gather the kind of data they need and understand when it comes to water management. He explains how their products work, what separates them from other AgTech companies, and why knowing how much water you’re using is critical to your business. He also discusses why he chose to keep their products open source and shares some of the upcoming events and projects they have lined up this year.

 

 

 

“Water use is important because it impacts the quality and yield of your crop.” - Reinier van der Lee

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • The contributing factors of understanding their need for water.
  • The methods they used to determine how much water they should use.
  • How Vinduino’s software provides water data for farmers.
  • What inspired them to name their product "Vinduino."
  • Where Reinier’s interest in growing grapes rose from.
  • Why they chose to keep their program open-source.
  • Encouraging others who are not tech savvy to innovate existing solutions.
  • When he decided to scale this his business.
  • What it means to sort good solutions from bad solutions.
  • Why simply more data from sensors is not good enough.
  • What's next for the Vinduino company?

 

 

Resource:

 

 

 

 

Connect with Reinier van der Lee

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Join the Conversation!

To get your most pressing ag questions answered and share your perspective on various topics we’ve discussed on the Future of Agriculture podcast, head over to SpeakPipe.com/FutureofAg and leave a recorded message!

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

 

Jan 15, 2020

 

 

David Chan is the COO and Founding Team Member at Farm Together, a company that offers a simplified approach to US farmland investment. The company not only serves Americans, but also welcomes foreign investors who are interested in growing their assets or simply having a continuous source of income in their retirement. David has over five years of Fin-Tech experience in the ag industry. He describes himself as a meteorologist by background, but a financier and technologist by training. David earned his MBA at Harvard Business School and is also part of the Board of Directors at the Harvard Alumni for Agriculture.

 

David joins me today to share how their company, Farm Together, will make it easier for local and foreign investors to invest in US farmlands. He explains how their platform works, when their investors get paid, and the due diligence they conduct prior to putting a property for sale. He discusses several risks involved in investing in different states. David also describes how they plan to put regenerative agriculture in the limelight.

 

 

 

“You must consider what the environment may look like in the future when you are purchasing these properties today.” - David Chan

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • Connecting insurance, farmlands, and current trends in institutional investments.
  • The characteristics of the typical user and investor on their platform.
  • How foreign investors can own farm lands in different locations.
  • How their due diligence process works.
  • Knowing the risks of investing in farmlands and how they calculate for them.
  • Why water is always a risk in any irrigated agriculture.
  • How they inform investors of earnings and how investors make money.
  • The feedback they receive from their clients.
  • The SIGMA legislation in California and what it is about.
  • The steps they have taken to make regenerative agriculture mainstream.

 

 

 

Connect with David Chan

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Join the Conversation!

To get your most pressing ag questions answered and share your perspective on various topics we’ve discussed on the Future of Agriculture podcast, head over to SpeakPipe.com/FutureofAg and leave a recorded message!

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

 

Jan 8, 2020

 

 

Kenneth Quinn is the former President of the World Food Prize Foundation, an organization that seeks to give individuals recognition for achievements that directly improve the quality, quantity, and availability of food in the world. Kenneth is often referred to as “the Ambassador” because he was the US Ambassador to the Kingdom of Cambodia. During his time as President, he received various high-level honors and awards from different organizations, including The American Farm Bureau and The Crop Science Society of America.

 

Kenneth joins me today to describe what the World Food Prize Foundation stands for, how it got started, and what makes it similar and different to the Nobel Peace Prize. He shares his journey, his time as Ambassador, and how he began to follow in the footsteps of Norman Borlaug. He explains the current state of agriculture across various countries and the agricultural hindrances that America needs to fix. Kenneth also discusses what he wants his legacy to be and the dangers that Americans face in regards to agricultural research.

 

 

 

“That's what I look for in the world: building peace through agriculture.” - Kenneth Quinn

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • Kenneth's life before agriculture and how he started to work in the industry.
  • The countries he’s worked with and the projects he has spearheaded.
  • The laureates who stood out to him over the years and their accomplishments.
  • Their international reach and the different nationalities in their group.
  • Notable agricultural milestones that ushered in an era of peace in American history.
  • His thoughts on China's road and rural infrastructure over the last few decades.
  • How roads are connected to hunger and suffering.
  • The history of the World Food Prize Foundation.
  • Addressing the challenge of feeding 10-billion people on the planet.
  • What he wants his legacy to be for the organization and the world.
  • The danger America faces when it comes to agricultural research.

 

 

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

 

Connect with Kenneth Quinn

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Join the Conversation!

To get your most pressing ag questions answered and share your perspective on various topics we’ve discussed on the Future of Agriculture podcast, head over to SpeakPipe.com/FutureofAg and leave a recorded message!

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

 

Jan 1, 2020

 

 

Happy New Year, and welcome to everyone listening to the very first episode of the year for the Future of Agriculture podcast. 2019 was such a good year for the show and was rife with amazing guests bearing their trade secrets and intelligent insights into the world of agriculture. To commemorate the year we had, I decided to categorize the overarching themes that summarize what 2019 was like for the Future of Agriculture podcast.

 

In today’s episode, I discuss the five trends that governed much of the events in 2019. I share a few clips of the most well-received episodes that relate to the trends we had. I discuss some of the trends that we’ll be doing a deeper dive this year and some of the changes that will happen. I also share some of your wonderful ideas and suggestions.

 

 

 

“Technology takes away gatekeepers in the food industry, just as it had done so in other industries.”

 

 

 

This Week on The Future of Agriculture Podcast:

 

  • The five themes we discussed in the show throughout 2019.
  • What it means to quantitatively prove farm sustainability
  • The importance of farmer profitability when it comes to innovation
  • Why we should be worried about the future of water for the ag industry
  • Changing Five Minute Farmer to Farmer's Spotlight
  • What's coming for 2020 on the Future of Ag Podcast
  • Ideas to improve the show and audience suggestions.

 

 

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We Are a Part of a Bigger Family! 

 

The Future of Agriculture Podcast is now part of the Farm and Rural Ag Network. Listen to more ag-related podcasts by subscribing on iTunes or on the Farm and Rural Ag Network Website today. 

 
 

Join the Conversation!

To get your most pressing ag questions answered and share your perspective on various topics we’ve discussed on the Future of Agriculture podcast, head over to SpeakPipe.com/FutureofAg and leave a recorded message!

 

Share the Ag-Love! 

 

Thanks for joining us on the Future of Agriculture Podcast – your spot for valuable information, content, and interviews with industry leaders throughout the agricultural space! If you enjoyed this week’s episode, please subscribe on iTunes and leave your honest feedback. Don’t forget to share it with your friends on your favorite social media spots! 

 

Learn more about AgGrad by visiting: 

Future of Agriculture Website

AgGrad Website

AgGrad on Twitter 
AgGrad on Facebook 
AgGrad on LinkedIn 
AgGrad on Instagram

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